broken walls and narratives

A not so revolutionary blog about feminism, socialism, activism, travel, nature, life, etc.

Archive for the tag “minnesota”

A Little Solo Camping

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A Little Solo Camping

H. Bradford

5/21/17

I was feeling a little stressed out last week, so I decided that I was going to go camping.  The stress stemmed from the fact that I felt that my plate was a little full.  I sometimes put in a little too much effort into some activist activities.  For instance, I devoted more time than I should have to researching pollinators and Frida Kahlo for recent presentations.  While these papers were for informal settings with friends, it made my week feel a little like finals week!  I needed a little break, so I set off on a solo camping adventure.  Honestly, I have never gone camping alone before.  Really, until just last year, I had never even gone camping before.  My first real camping experience was my trip to Africa last summer.  I will be camping again this June in Central Asia.  Go big or go home, I guess?  Local adventures are also fun (and cheaper).  For a small dose of adventure, I checked the Minnesota State Park’s website and decided to go camping at Wild River State Park because the park was hosting two birding hikes in celebration of International Migratory Bird Day.


Wild River State Park is located about fourteen miles east of North Branch, MN on the St. Croix River.  I don’t recall visiting the park before, but I may have visited it while I lived in Cambridge, MN as a teen.  It was about a two and a half hour drive from Duluth.  I left on Friday at around noon and arrived by the late afternoon.  I stopped for lunch along the way and also picked up some DNR approved firewood outside of the park.  I had reserved a campsite that was several sites away from other reservations, as I wanted to be alone.  Upon arrival, I checked in, set-up my tent, and read a little from the Frida Kahlo biography.  The campsite was fairly busy, with many of the sites reserved.  I was a little surprised to see so many massive RVs, complete with trucks, bicycles, grills, and scampering hordes children.  From six to nine pm, each of the campsites seemed to be a Thanksgiving feast of grilled foods.  The campground itself was a little too chaotic to be relaxing.  I walked around a little to orient myself, then hiked for the next three to four hours along the various trails near the campsite.   Thankfully, the trails were quiet.  I only saw a handful of hikers once I was away from the campground.  I was immediately struck by the bountiful birdlife.  The forest was alive with the sounds of numerous birds, which flitted by with frustrating speed.  I noticed several bluebirds and a rose-breasted grosbeak during my hike.  I also heard an owl later on, but could not identify it.  Another highlight was a pair of noisy ravens.  Beyond the birds, the forest was teeming with trilliums and other wildflowers.  Since it was warmer than in Duluth, the season was further along, with more flowers and foliage than in the north. DSCF6175 I wore myself out with walking and settled back down at my campsite.  I build a fire, but didn’t actually pack any foods for cooking as I was only going to be gone for less than 24 hours.  Instead, I nibbled on the snacks that I had packed while watching the fire and listening to the sounds of the forest.  It was very calming and empowering, since it provided me mental space from the daily demands of work and activism.  It was empowering in that I felt proud of myself for hiking alone, driving there myself, setting up the tent and fire, and entertaining myself with my own company.  The only downside was that it would have been nice to pack a lamp or candle so that I could have written in my journal after sunset.  I also forgot to pack extra batteries.  I also managed to forget to pack my glasses and a pair of flipflops.  My headlamp went dead and it made using the restroom difficult.  Despite these shortfalls in my planning, I enjoyed staring at the fire and remained with it until it died.  I then retreated to my tent for sleep.  Even after using the bathroom twice before bedtime, I inevitably awoke in the middle of the night to contemplate answering nature’s call or trying to wait until morning. DSCF6192 DSCF6208 My sleep was uneasy.  I certainly felt worn out, but I tossed and turned.  My mind was full of thoughts and ideas.  I was also excited about my mini adventure.   I am not sure how many hours of sleep I managed to obtain.  By five in the morning, the birds were singing in full force, so I abandoned my efforts at sleeping.  I woke up early, packed up all of my things, and nibbled on granola while studying bird books.  I found a used book on warblers of the Midwest from the Superior Public Library book sale.  At about seven in the morning, I left the campsite for the boat landing on the St. Croix river, where a bird walk was scheduled.  I was the first birder to arrive.  Two seasoned birders began their work listening for songs and scanning the treetops.  They adeptly identified birds by their songs and picked them out even as they zipped through the sky.  I was not very skilled at identification, but at least saw some familiar birds and took notes on what the others saw and heard.  I am not sure how every birder I meet is so skilled.  There must be beginners like me.  It takes years of studying to identify birds.  Where are all of the novices?

(Some of the photos are blurry, but it should depict a Scarlet tanager, black and white warbler, American red start, yellow rumped warbler, and Eastern bluebird) Once more birders arrived, we hiked around for two hours.  The goal was to record all of the species of birds we saw that morning so that the data could be compared to other International Birding Day counts at the park.  There were bluebirds and Baltimore orioles.  We saw tree swallows living in bluebird houses.  A female wood duck flew overhead.  An Eastern kingbird showed off the white markings on its tail feathers.  A few house wrens had taken up residence in some ramshackle abandoned bird houses.  We also saw many warblers, including a blue winged warbler, yellow warbler, golden winged warbler, palm warbler, black and white warbler, and American redstart.  The warblers were quick and kept to the top of the trees.  A flash of yellow would sail by overhead and everyone immediately knew what it was.  Faint chirps were also readily identified.  I stood there, stupefied by the variety of quick moving, similar looking, yellow birds.  Since this hike, I have gone out birding around Duluth and Superior and managed to identify some more warblers.  Maybe someday I will know them as well as the other birders.  In all, I wrote down over twenty birds that were new to my life list.  The group counted over fifty birds for the total species count.


Following the count, I decided to go on a final hike.  I drove to the visitor’s center, where a scarlet tanager was hanging out in a treetop.  An ovenbird sang in the distance.  The visitor’s center was soon visited by a young black bear.  I wandered along a trail for a short final hike.  Along the hike, I saw several more scarlet tanagers and Baltimore orioles.  I also saw a yellow bellied sapsucker and a group of cowbirds.  With the final hike out of the way, I set off for the two hour drive home.  But, the birding adventures had helped me with my bird identification skills.  For the past several evenings since then, I have tried to memorize bird songs.  Auditory bird identification is not a skill that I have spent any time developing and I can see how useful it is.

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Learning to identify birds is challenging.  There is a lot of information that one has to gather in a short amount of time.  Birds are very quick, so size, color, beak shape, flight pattern, song, behaviors, etc. are some of the data that one must collect within a few seconds.  The reward is a better understanding of the inhabitants of the natural world and a keener eye for the hidden details around us (at least in regard to birds).  Another bonus is the ability to add a bird to a life list.  I like lists.  They make me feel accomplished, since it allows me to quantify and organize some aspect of my reality.     Even camping adds to my lists, as it added to my list of state parks I have visited.  More than an odd obsession with quantifying my life, camping offered quietude and self-efficacy.    It also offered a relatively low cost sample of adventure.

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Travel and My Fears

 

Travel and My Fears

H. Bradford

5/21/17

I am getting ready for another trip and I feel a little afraid.  This time, I am traveling to Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan for three weeks.  Like always, I will go alone, though I will meet up with a group of strangers after a few days in Ashgabat.  From there, we will embark on an overland camping trip through the stans.  When I first fantasized about the trip, I imagined the wonder of seeing the dehydrated remains of the Aral Sea.  I imagined myself following the Silk Road through ancient, exotic cities.  I would traverse the rugged formerly Soviet states, admiring mosques, monuments, and a few remaining statues of Lenin.  It seemed very intrepid.  All winter, the trip was abstract.  I read books about the history of the region.  But, now that the trip is less than two weeks away, a new reality is setting in.  I am going to have to bush camp in the desert with scorpions, cobras, and several days without a shower.  I am going to have to navigate Ashgabat alone as a solo female American traveler.  Turkmenistan gets a fraction of the tourists that North Korea gets each year (about 9,000 compared to 35,000).  I am also moderately terrified of contracting dysentery, typhus, or any number of food or waterborne diseases.  (I do have some antibiotics from last year’s trip and was vaccinated last year against a variety of illnesses).   Also, ATM use in those countries is unreliable, so, I will have to carry a lot of cash and hope it is enough for the duration of my trip…and that I don’t lose it or have it stolen.  Internet is somewhat patchy in those countries and my cellphone does not work out of the country.  I have faced that same dilemmas before and fared alright, but, it does make me a little worried.

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The Darvaza gas crater in the Karakum desert- one of the places where I will be “bush camping” in just over two weeks from now.


Fear is not new.  I’ve always been afraid of travel.  Usually, there is this brave person inside of me, who is full of fantasy and confidence.  That person decides on some adventure, which looks great as a portrait in my imagination, but is not as fun as a lived reality.  Let’s call that person “Brave H.” For instance, when I was 19 years old, I decided that I would go to London and Paris alone.  I came from a town of 250 people and had never been on an airplane or road in a taxi.  Go big or go home, Brave H. says…until I am actually trying to figure out how airports work, on my first plane ride, and going across the ocean.  In retrospect, it is really no big deal.  That sort of travel seems easy.  But, to 19 year old me, that was a pretty big deal.  Over fifty countries later, I am still afraid, but the fear changes with new challenges.


Last year, I went to Southern Africa for an overland camping trip in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe.  As the plane took off, I was pretty terrified.  I was terrified before then.  I had never actually gone camping, but somehow Brave H. signed me up for three weeks of it…in Africa.  I was afraid of being alone.  I was afraid of being the victim of crime- sexual assault in particular.  I was afraid of becoming very ill.  I was afraid that I was not up to the challenge of camping or the long days on bumpy roads.  I was a little afraid of insects, snakes, and animals.  Somehow, it wasn’t as bad as I feared. In fact, it was wonderful, fun, and even much easier than I imagined.  It took a few days of camping to come to the conclusion that I was going to make it.  Any small hardship was more than compensated for in the form of astonishing landscapes and animals.

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(A view of Victoria Falls from a helicopter.  I had a lot of anxiety as I had never been in a helicopter before.  But, overcoming fear and anxiety does have its rewards).

I was afraid the year before when Brave H. decided it was a good idea to visit Belarus and Ukraine, entirely alone.  After all, Brave H. wanted to see Chernobyl.  Brave H. wanted to visit a nature reserve outside of Minsk and partake in the weird splendor of the Cold War remnant.  So, that is where I went.  I don’t regret it.  Kiev was really beautiful and there was so much to see.  Minsk was not really pretty at all, but unique.  Neither place was teeming with tourists, adding a sense of bravery to my adventure.  I only spent a few days in each place.  I think that traveling often has waves of fear.  For instance, there is the anxiety of getting from the airport to the hotel without being ripped off or taken advantage of by a taxi driver.  Upon arriving at the hotel, there is elation after overcoming the first challenge.  After that, there are anxieties around finding a currency exchange, navigating the metro system, walking alone in the park, the other individuals staying in the hostel, the mysterious military parade, getting turned around, trying to find the monument to Baba Yar, etc.  It is like this on every adventure.  The ups and downs of figuring things out and staying safe in unfamiliar places.

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I have felt at least a little afraid during each of my trips.  I don’t particularly like being afraid, but I do like the feeling of accomplishment from figuring something out or successfully completing a task or adventure.  I suppose it makes me feel stronger and braver.  Of course, this only serves to inspire Brave H.to dream up bigger adventures and greater challenges.  I am not a robust, energetic, extroverted adventurer.  I am cowardly.  I like books and birds.  I enjoy museums and botanical gardens. I don’t really care for being dirty, lonely, terrified, tired, or sick.  Brave H. won’t stand for that.  Nope.  Life is too short.  I want to see interesting things and test myself.  Granted, there are people who test themselves far more.  For instance, there was a woman in her 60s on my last trip who went scuba diving with alligators in the Zambezi river.  Brave H. wants to be her.   Normal, nerdy, cowardly H. does not like water or all the pressure from being under water.  The same woman climbed mountains and scuba dived all over the world.  She also traveled to the “Stans” for an overland trip.  I will never be one of those amazing adventurers that I meet when I am out traveling.  The ones who inspire Brave H. to concoct an adventure or dream of new challenges.  I will always be afraid.  As I test myself, the boundaries of the fear extends to the next horizon.  I hope that horizon takes me to interesting places.  Maybe I will trek up mountains (at least smaller ones that don’t require actual climbing gear).  Maybe I will learn to scuba dive.  Maybe I will never do those things.  Maybe there is a limit to how far the boundary can be pushed.  It may be limited by experiencing disease or a discomfort so great that it pushes me back into my comfort zone.  Whatever happens, it is my hope that I can one day be that old lady who inspires others with her fearlessness and zeal for life.

dscf4256Brave H. thinks she is a bad ass.   Well, maybe someday it will be true.

Bird Nerding Notes: Birding with My Mother

Bird Nerding Notes: Birding with My Mother

H. Bradford

4/10/17


My mother and I don’t spend that much time together.  I keep a pretty busy schedule which doesn’t always align well with the schedules of others.  But, last weekend we both went birding together.  I wanted to visit Savannah Portage State Park and Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge for some birding adventures.  I invited her along and since she wasn’t busy, we set off together for a Saturday of bird watching.


 

The day began with a drive to Wright, MN.   It is only an hour from where I now live, but I only visit a few times a year.  We went to what once was the Wright Place Cafe, which I hadn’t eaten at in over a decade.  I was a waitress there for a summer, back when I was 19 years old.  In a way, it is surreal returning to where I grew up since it is very foreign to me, yet near.  I feel like a ghost.  That I was never really there at all, since the person I am now is so distant from that past self.   There are so many years between us.   Following breakfast, we set out on our birding adventure.


Our first sighting was just outside of Tamarack, MN.  We noticed a grayish, hawk-like bird on a power line, overlooking two pastures.  I turned the car around to get a closer look.  Unfortunately, this scared the bird away.  After a careful pursuit, I managed to get a photograph of the unknown bird.  The zoom capacity of my camera is not that great, but it is enough to aid in the identification of birds (even if the photos themselves are not that wonderful).   We flipped back and forth between the camera image and our bird book.  Finally, we determined it was an American Kestrel.  I wrote it down in my little notebook.

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Our journey continued towards Savannah Portage State Park.  The road wound around various lakes, where we caught sight of swans.  However, the shoulder was too narrow and the ditch to deep to stop and look at the swans.  My mother promised that I would see swans later, but it was frustrating to have to pass up so many of them along the way!  Finally, we arrived at the state park.  I bought a sticker for the year and a patch (I am collecting state park patches).  What should I do with my collection of patches?  My mother suggested that I could sew them onto a jacket, which I wear for my state park adventures.  This seems extremely nerdy, but also like something I might actually do.  I like having special apparel for various occasions.


Savannah Portage State Park did not have many birds.  The small lakes in the park were still frozen and it was the middle of the day by the time we arrived.  We went on a short hike by a lake and over a bog walk.  This was neat, since we found frozen pitcher plants and overturned trees (from the storm last summer).   I would like to visit again during the summer.

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We drove around Big Sandy Lake, spotting more swans.  In 1850, Sandy Lake was the site of a massacre of Native Americans.  Although I never learned this in school (and grew up just 30-40 min away), over 200 Ojibwe died there from illness, starvation, and cold.  They were told to go there to receive their yearly annuity payment and supplies from the BIA, which arrived late and in short supply.   There is a small plaque memorializing the events at a rest area along Highway 65.   This is a reminder that the area really doesn’t belong to settlers, even though it serves as a recreational area today.


After stopping at the Dairy Queen in McGregor, we continued on to Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge.  This is where we spotted many birds.  Our first encounter was on a small bridge, where we saw various ducks.  Of course, the ducks were shy and quickly scattered.  I used my camera to try to hone in on some of the distant waterfowl.  There were some unique sightings.  The first sighting was a duck with a light gray colored back, dark head, and black chest.  This was hard to identify and we wrongly identified it as a canvasback.  However, after re-examining the photos, it was actually a Greater scaup (or it could be a lesser scaup?).  The duck had a blue bill and yellow eye.  It was my first time identifying a Greater scaup.  Another duck, was a small, black and white duck which frequently dove underwater.  We identified it as a bufflehead.  This is the first time that I have identified one since I began birding.

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We explored the many lakes and roads of the wildlife refuge.  Interestingly, when we were stopped on the bridge, a friendly Native American man on a makeshift motorbike stopped by to invite us to watch him make maple syrup.  We didn’t take him up on the offer, but he said that there was a group of people making syrup in the park.  Even though the refuge is mostly used for recreation and bird watching, it was also a reminder that it also has cultural significance.   The park is still used by Native Americans for harvesting wild rice, which as the name suggests, grows in the lakes of the area.  The park also features burial mounds which may date back to as far as 1000 BC.


On Rice Lake itself, we spotted bald eagles, trumpeter swans, various ducks, a muskrat, and an Eastern bluebird perched nearby.  We heard whooping cranes from somewhere in the area.  The ducks were too far away to identify, but the area was teeming with life and I finally was able to see the swans!


We returned to my mother’s house about 20 minutes away.  Near her home, we spotted a killdeer and a turkey.  The turkey was quick to escape my camera, so I only obtained a photo of its rump.  We also saw two more trumpeter swans on School House Lake near her house.

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Overall, it was a fun day.  Birding can actually be tiring, since there are highs and lows.  It is definitely a high to see a bird that I haven’t recorded before.  The fact that birds move quickly or might be too far away to identify is a low.   It also requires some degree of focus and vigilance, since birds can appear anywhere and may be hard to spot.  By the end of the day, I was tired!

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Bird Nerd Notes: Early Spring Birding

Bird Nerd Notes: Early Spring Birding

H. Bradford

4/1/17

When I was a kid, I never had much interest in birds.  My grandma Bradford kept a feeder, which was visiting by pine grosbeaks and evening grosbeaks.  My grandpa Bradford would feed the ducks near his house old bread or cracked corn.   My grandma Walli loved bluebirds.   Growing up in the country and on a lake, birds were a part of rural life.  Birds were interesting, but never caught my attention.   Oddly enough, it was plants that captured my attention.  I remember in the first and second grade, I would draw pictures of the plants that I found growing in the woods near my home.  I folded these pages in half, making botanical guides.  I wanted to be a botanist.   Birds didn’t interest me much at all.


I enjoy trying new hobbies, so my new year’s resolution in 2016 was to try birding as a new hobby.  I simply wanted to try something new and expand my knowledge into a new frontier.    My first birding adventure was pretty lackluster.  I went to Jay Cooke State Park for a New Year’s birding hike, but we only saw chickadees.  However, later that month a wayward Ivory billed gull appeared in Duluth.  I set out early one morning before my work meeting to try to find it.  Spotting it and then being joined by other birders….all older people with fancy cameras and binoculars, was a neat experience.  We were all there for the same thing…though me with a lot less gear.   (I do have a camera and binoculars now, but certainly not expensive and i really, really wish I had more ability to zoom… )   I think what really cemented this hobby was my trip to Africa, where I saw over 150 species of birds.   But, birding doesn’t have to involve travel or expensive gear.  It can happen in the backyard or in nearby parks.

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I am still learning to identify birds and I am not terribly studious in my approach.   I treat this hobby more like an endless scavenger hunt.  It is exciting to add new birds to my list.  In the process of searching for birds, I learn more about them, how to identify them, when and where to find them, etc.  So, it is experiential learning.  It mostly involves seeing the swift departure of some unknown bird and the disappointment that I did not identify it in time.  That happened to me several times today.  But, when I do find a new bird, it is great!  Sometimes, I see a bird, but I don’t have my binoculars or camera.  Again, it is a missed opportunity!   Another frustrating aspect of this hobby is that most people my age…are pretty indifferent to birds.  So, I feel like a bird nerd…who prattles on about some bird that no one cares about.  I have to monitor myself to make sure I don’t bore others or put them off with this hobby that they have no interest in.

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No birds.  The story of my March birding endeavors.


One thing that I have learned this month is that early March is sort of the doldrums of birding.  Until this year, I never really paid attention to what birds are around and when.  Sure, I always noticed the spring and fall migrations, but I never really paid that close attention to the patterns of bird life around me.   In early March, I went to the Sax Zim Bog.  This was the last weekend that the bird center there was open for the winter season.  I had visited the center in mid-February.   The contrast was stark.  There were far fewer birds active during my my early March visit.   I saw a single gray jay, in contrast to the many gray jays I saw in February.  There were no more flocks of white winged cross bills.   However, I did see some pine grosbeaks at a feeder on the way out of the birding area.  Even though the birds were scarce, I enjoyed taking a snowy hike with my mother.   It is too bad that the Sax Zim Bog is so remote.  It takes about an hour to drive there and the roads are winding, dirt country roads.  Still, it is a great place to go birding.

In mid-march, I went to St. Croix State Park.  The goal was to try to do some birding, while reaching my OTHER new year’s resolution of visiting a few more new state parks.  I have never visited St. Croix State Park before, but it is only about an hour away near Hinckley, Minnesota.   The park was almost entirely devoid of birds, with the exception of crows.   I enjoyed a hike and had fun searching for agates in the parking lot with Dan, but as far as birding goes, it was a pretty uneventful day.    However, we did spot some immature bald eagles on the way to the park.  After leaving the park, we spotted two fields of what I assume were tundra swans.  I assumed they were tundra swans because they migrate through Minnesota in March as they head to the arctic to nest.   There were also other tundra swans spotted in area fields that week (which is why I made the guess that it could be tundra swans).  To really identity the difference, I would have had to see the beak, which is often yellow at the base versus all black (for a trumpeter swan).    They also have different beak shapes.  Tundra swans are also more numerous, and since there were two fields of swans, it seemed logical that they would be tundra swans over the less common trumpeter swans.

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These swans were too far away to perfectly identify.

Throughout the month, I went on various hikes, but did not see much bird life other than black capped chickadees, white breasted nuthatches, and crows.  However, with the warm weather this week, there has suddenly been an explosion of waterfowl.  Today, I went to Wisconsin Point intent on a short hike, but ended up trudging through swampy cattails to try to identify some unknown waterbirds.  I am sure there were new species of birds for me to see, but I could only positively identify a few groups of Common mergansers.  Still, this is a new bird for my list!  Otherwise, I saw many familiar birds such as Canadian geese and red winged blackbirds.  I also saw a gull with a black face, but it flew by too quickly to positively identity.  In any event, the sudden appearance of so many waterfowl heralds the end of my birding doldrums this month.   In all, my experience this month make me feel more attuned to the seasonal movements of birds in my region.  My goal was to see 50 new species of birds this year.  That may be a bit ambitious.  But, I can say that I am slowly becoming a bird nerd.

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Glow for Roe: The Importance of Being Seen

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Glow for Roe: The Importance of Being Seen

H. Bradford

1/28/17

    Visibility is important to any social movement.  For instance, Pride Festivals and parades make sexual diversity visible to the general public.  Offices, newspapers, fliers, and tables at events are ways that socialist groups make themselves visible.  The Women’s March on Washington, along with the marches elsewhere in the country, was a way to make the feminist movement visible across America.  It drew attention to demands and anger in the face of this administration, but also in response to the decades of failures and defeats in realizing gender equality in this country.  There are times when movements must strategically choose invisibility, such as when the violent repression of the state is so great that visibility risks death, injury, or imprisonment.  At this moment in time, this is not generally the case.  This is the time to be visible.  That was my reasoning for trying to organize “Glow for Roe.”  I think it is important for people who support reproductive rights to be seen.  The point of the event was to turn out for a “glowing” protest in support of reproductive rights.  It was one of several Roe v. Wade events last weekend, each of which raised the profile of reproductive rights activism in the Twin Ports.  The following is why it is important to stand up and be seen.


We are the Majority:

 

According to NARAL Pro-Choice America, seven out of ten Americans want to keep abortion legal.  In a 2015 survey from the Brookings Institute, 59% of women reported that they wanted abortion to be legal in all or most cases.  It is fair to say that most Americans want abortion to remain legal.  So, this is excellent!  By participating in events like Glow for Roe, the 40 days of Choice, Planned Parenthood support pickets, or the Hotdish Militia’s party/counter protest of the Jericho March, pro-choice activists can show other pro-choice individuals that they are not alone.  Those who are engaged in social movements are always a minority of those who actually support them.  As such, activists play a role in affirming the beliefs and identities of those who may not be visibly involved in the movement.   They also play a role in visibly countering the beliefs of those who disagree.

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Abortion is stigmatized:

 

While most people support keeping abortion legal, many people also support restrictions on legal abortions.  These abortions include such things as waiting periods, parental consent, funding barriers, restrictions on how late in a pregnancy abortion can occur, mandatory ultrasounds, hospital admission rights, etc.  According to the Guttmacher Institute, 338 abortion restrictions were introduced between 2010-2016, accounting for 30% of the restrictions passed since 1973.  So, while public opinion generally supports legal abortion, in reality, legal abortion has been eroded by an onslaught of restrictions.  Restrictions make it more difficult and expensive to obtain an abortion.  At the core of these restrictions is the idea that abortion is something other than health care.  While one in three women have had abortions, it is secret and stigmatized.  In the 1990s, Hillary Clinton popularized the idea that abortion should be safe, legal, and rare.  By adding “rare” to the discourse, it stigmatized abortion and framed it as a moral rather than medical issue.  There have been 1,142 restrictions on abortion passed since 1973.  According to NARAL-Pro Choice America, states have passed 835 anti-choice measures since 1995.  This means that Over 70% of the restrictions have been passed since the mid 1990s!  Stigmatizing abortion or calling for it to become rare justifies restricting it, thus further limiting access.  Being visible, on the street, protesting for choice is a way to be seen as an unapologetic supporter of abortion and the women who make that choice.  It is a way to destigmatize abortion, bringing abortion as a word, idea, and medical experience into the public sphere.

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The Other Side is Visible

Another important reason to protest in support of reproductive rights is because the pro-life movement is large, well-funded, and enjoys a lot of institutional support from churches, social movement organizations, and even the government (through politicians, tax breaks, and state funded crisis pregnancy centers).  They are visible.  Not only are they visible, they are violent.   In 1994, arson destroyed a Planned Parenthood in Brainerd, MN burned along with several neighboring businesses.  In 2002, five shots were fired into the rebuilt building, breaking a window and damaging a wall and ceiling.  The building finally closed in 2011 due to losing Title X funding.  The location did not provide abortion services.  The Planned Parenthood in Grand Rapids, MN was also fired at in 2002.  Since 1993, at least 11 people have died in attacks on abortion clinics.  There are elements of the pro-life movement who seem to believe that they are at war.  Of course, even their peaceful demonstrating constitutes a war against women, but for some, there is a call to violence.  This is terrifying.  This is also a reason why visibly supporting choice is important.  Clinic staff and patrons need defenders who will visibly stand up for their right to life!  At some level, not mobilizing into a visible mass movement is irresponsible when abortion clinic workers life on the line each day they go to work.  Our visibility is the least we can do.

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Our Rights are Threatened:

It is important to be seen because our rights are threatened.  They have been threatened since 1973.  The barrage of restrictions.  The Hyde Amendment.  The Global Gag rule-again.  Here we are, forty four years after Roe v. Wade and it feels like reproductive rights are a fluke.  A set of rights that slipped past the goalie.  No one actually believes that women are human beings.  No one actually believes that women can have autonomy over their body.  No one actually believes that women should not be punished for having sex.  There are people in this society that want to see women go to jail for having an abortion.  Despite having the largest prison population in the world, this warped logic concludes the United States would be better if we imprisoned ⅓ of all women.  The only people who believe that the equality of women hinges upon their ability to control their bodies are feminists.  Like abortion, feminism has been stigmatized.  It is a bad word.  No one wants to admit to having an abortion OR being a feminist. Well, it is important to be visible as a feminist since no one else is going to advocate for women.  No one else believes abortion access is a fundamental and necessary conditions of our liberation.  We are the vanguard of all women.  Our rights are threatened.  They have barely been realized.  No one else will stand up for our rights, but ourselves.

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We Can be Visible:

 

There are places and times in history where women have not been able to be visible.  I imagine communist Romania, wherein women were forced to have pregnancy tests each month at their workplaces.  They were monitored by the state to make sure they did not have abortions.  At the same time, contraceptives were banned by the state.  Thus, women were given no choice.  Well, some chose illegal abortion, resulting in the death of over 9,000 women.  I consider death a choiceless choice.  Until last year, abortion was illegal in all cases in Chile.  This meant that an 11 year old rape victim was denied the right to abortion in a high profile case several years again.  Since many Latin American countries have very restrictive abortion laws, women at risk of Zika virus were told to abstain from sex for two years.  In Saudi Arabia, women can have an abortion only if pregnancy threatens their life, and then with parental or spousal consent.  We are fortunate that we still have some rights and that we are able to assemble and speak our minds without serious threat from the police (in most cases).  The Women’s March was criticized for its coziness with the police, but we can certainly use this to our advantage.  We should speak out while we can and because we can!

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The Twin Ports Women’s Rights Coalition

    The Twin Ports Women’s Rights Coalition

H. Bradford

(The following was written for the University of MN-Duluth’s Women and Gender Studies Department Newsletter)

Many people may not be aware that Duluth has its own feminist activist group, so I would like to take a moment to introduce you to the Twin Ports Women’s Rights Coalition (TPWRC).  TPWRC was founded in September 2014 by a group of activists who were involved with ad hoc protests of the 40 Days for Life.  For those unfamiliar with the 40 Days for Life, it is an international anti-choice event wherein volunteers spend forty days outside of abortion providers with the hope of ending abortion through prayer and protest.  The anti-choice campaign began in 2004, is organized through local churches, and happens in the fall and spring each year.  Last spring, the event mobilized 120,000 volunteers through 4,700 churches.  Locally, the 40 Days for Life is held in September through the end of October outside of the Building for Women from 8 am to 8 pm.  Counter protesting them is important because their presence shames women who use the clinic and seeks to sway public opinion against abortion.  Because 95% of Minnesota counties do not have abortion providers, defending our clinic in Duluth is essential for ensuring that women in Northern Minnesota and Wisconsin continue to have access to abortion services.  Furthermore,  over the last forty years, abortion rights have been whittled away by a relentless onslaught of anti-choice legislation that mandates biased counseling, parental consent, waiting periods, and funding restrictions.  With this in mind, the activists who founded the Twin Ports Women’s Rights Coalition have hosted regular protests of the 40 Days for Life since 2010.  We sought create an organization which could continue these protests into the future and organize other feminist actions in the community.  This is how the organization came into fruition in 2014.


Since its founding in 2014, the group has organized a variety of feminist events.  Aside from the counter protest of the 40 Days for Life, TPWRC has organized a support picket of Roe v. Wade.  Last year, this involved a “glo-test” wherein participants carried signs and wore glow sticks.  We have also organized “Chalk for Choice” events this fall, which entails using chalk to create positive messages and artwork in the plaza of the Building for Women. The group has also organized a feminist book club, which will resume this winter.  Other events include panels for International Women’s Day and Roe v. Wade and monthly “Feminist Frolics.”  Feminist Frolics combine education with outdoor adventure.  For instance, in August we went for a hike after listening to a brief lecture about how patriarchy shapes our relationship to nature.  In September, we went foraging for wild food while learning about the history and economics of foraging and gleaning.  Another exciting project that our group has been working on is launching a radical cheerleading group.  The Rah Rah Revolutionaries has participated in several local protests since their re-launch this fall.  Through these various activities, the TPWRC seeks to promote feminist activism while educate ourselves and our community about feminism.


Admittedly, our activist group is modest.  At many of our events, we have less than a dozen attendees.  Our level of activity ebbs and flows with the work schedules of our organizers.  However, the call to feminist activism has hardly been greater.  Feminism is misunderstood and misrepresented in society.  At the same time, women continue to be underpaid and undervalued in the economy.  They continue to be sexually assaulted and abused, then blamed and shamed for the violence against them.  Abortion rights are curtailed, while students are provided skeletal sex education, daycare is as expensive as rent, and we are the one of three nations in the world that does not provide women with paid maternity leave.  Shockingly, denying voting rights to women has become a popular demand in some circles!  It seems that even the most basic rights granted to women have been called into question.  Feminism should be not feared and averted, but should be reclaimed and asserted to make the powers of capitalist patriarchy tremble with fear.  If you would like to join this fight, the Twin Ports Women’s Rights Coalition can be found on Facebook or can be contacted via email at Hbradford@Css.edu


						
					

Just Four: Adventures in Four State Parks

I have over thirty goals for this year.  One of my goals was to visit four new state parks.  Honestly, this is a fairly simple goal because there are many area state parks which I have never visited.  This has been a great goal that injected some fun and learning into my summer.  So, here is my review of four regional state parks:

  1. Moose Lake State Park: I went on a Moose Lake adventure. The adventure began with a trip to the Fire and Depot Museum.  The depot did not interest me as much, but the information about the 1918 fire was certainly gruesome, sad, and compelling.  The fire was the worst natural disaster in Minnesota history, destroying communities, hundreds of people, and injuring tens of thousands.  The more interesting thing in the museum was the personal accounts from survivors of the fire.  These were tales of people burning alive in cars or suffocating in root cellars.  I visited the museum during Agate Days.

Agate Days is a celebration of agates.  I have never attended before because it seems to occur on the same date as Wrong Days in Wright (which I attended as a child).  I was shocked to see that every side street was clogged with cars.  People are much more enthusiastic about agates than I had imagined.  The highlight was watching two dump trucks unload loads of gravel onto a main street.  Hundreds of people waited for a gunshot to signal that they could descend upon these piles of rocks on the street.  Hidden in the rocks were agates and quarters.  Adults and children carried water, buckets, and shovels for sorting through the rocks.  I am not very aggressive so I stayed out of the fray.  I ventured in briefly and nabbed a single agate.

The dump truck:

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The crowd goes wild!

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My prize:

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After Agate Days, I headed to the Moose Lake State Park. This was pretty appropriate for the theme of the day because there is a small geological museum at the park.  At the center, I learned how agates are actually formed.  Basically, a billion years ago North America was being split apart (just as Africa is today along the East African rift).  A bell curve shaped mid-continental rift formed were Lake Superior now exists, extending southward through Iowa and westward towards Nebraska.  This splitting allowed for magma to seep upwards to the surface of the earth. Air bubbles formed within the lava, creating space for agates to later form.  The agates are basically iron stained silica deposits that formed in these gas bubbles over time.  When glaciers later scoured the landscape, the agates were dislodged from the surrounding rock, broken up, and moved about.  This is why there are agates in this region (and other regions along the mid-continental rift or where glaciers moved these agates).  So the best thing about the Moose Lake State Park is the small geology museum.  I love to learn and though I am not versed in geology, I felt that I learned a lot that day!

  1. Tettegouche State Park:

I review this in my blog post about ferns.  I went to this park for the purpose of learning about ferns.  Since then, I have purchased a fern guide and borrowed a guide from the library.  Even with the guides, I have a very difficult time distinguishing ferns from one another.  However, I believe I can identify about five common ferns and a few “friends of ferns”.  I will continue to work on this skill as it is on my list of goals for the year.

3: Crosby Recreation Area:

I reviewed this in another blog post as well.  It isn’t exactly a state park, but because it is a recreation area I thought I could count it.

  1. Tower Soudan State Park:

This park was super!  I visited the park in early July with Adam and Lucas.  It is unique because it is a state park that offers mine tours.  So, of course, we shelled out the $12 to go on the mine tour.  The Tower Soudan Mine is the oldest and deepest mine in Minnesota.  The tour begins with a rather bland video which discusses the “Cadillac of Mines.”  As a socialist, I was a little skeptical about the shimmering safety of the mine.  However, apparently it was a fairly safe mine compared to others as it was dry (unlike the Crosby mines which flooded, leaked, and were muddy), cool, and solid (the Ely greenstone is strong enough that mine did not require lumber supports in shafts).  After the video, we put on hard hats and squeezed into an elevator, where we made an exciting two minute decent into the mine.  Actually, the guide for the tour was Bill Lah, who was a student at UWS with me.  So, it was interesting to see someone I knew.  Bill was a great guide.  After loading us onto an underground train, he told us that the iron from the mine was of particularly high quality as it was derived from specular hematite.  Some of the specular hematite was still visible on the walls of the cavern in blotches of glittery gray.  It was used as an additive in making iron, though this became obsolete with the invention of oxygen tanks (which could add oxygen to the iron).  The new technology resulted in the end of the mine, as extraction from the vertical underground mine was no longer cost effective.  Bill discussed the working conditions of the mine and was clear to note that although the mine was safer than other mines, it was never easy or safe work.  He also sang a song in Slovenian, as his grandparents came to the U.S. from Slovenia and his grandfather was a miner.  After the mine tour, we milled around the park, where there is an assortment of mining structures and equipment.  Generally speaking, the tour helped me to learn a bit more about the process of iron mining.  On the nature side of things, the mine is home to a healthy population of bats (which have not had white nose syndrome).

Aside from mining tours, the Soudan Mine is a research center for physics experiments.  There are science themed tours wherein visitors can learn more about the neutrino research at the park.  We only had time and money for one tour, so I was not able to learn about the neutrino research.  Oh well, I could always return sometime!

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Visting the state parks has been great.  It has made for an educational summer.  Aside from the four listed, I have been a frequent visitor to Jay Cooke State Park this summer.  There are many free lectures and hikes on topics related to identifying trees, wild flowers, geology, etc.  As a result, I believe that I have increased my knowledge of nature quite a bit this summer…but that can be the topic of another blog post.  For now, I have enjoyed these little adventures.

Tower Soudan Mine Park Images:

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