broken walls and narratives

A not so revolutionary blog about feminism, socialism, activism, travel, nature, life, etc.

Archive for the tag “birding”

A Little Solo Camping

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A Little Solo Camping

H. Bradford

5/21/17

I was feeling a little stressed out last week, so I decided that I was going to go camping.  The stress stemmed from the fact that I felt that my plate was a little full.  I sometimes put in a little too much effort into some activist activities.  For instance, I devoted more time than I should have to researching pollinators and Frida Kahlo for recent presentations.  While these papers were for informal settings with friends, it made my week feel a little like finals week!  I needed a little break, so I set off on a solo camping adventure.  Honestly, I have never gone camping alone before.  Really, until just last year, I had never even gone camping before.  My first real camping experience was my trip to Africa last summer.  I will be camping again this June in Central Asia.  Go big or go home, I guess?  Local adventures are also fun (and cheaper).  For a small dose of adventure, I checked the Minnesota State Park’s website and decided to go camping at Wild River State Park because the park was hosting two birding hikes in celebration of International Migratory Bird Day.


Wild River State Park is located about fourteen miles east of North Branch, MN on the St. Croix River.  I don’t recall visiting the park before, but I may have visited it while I lived in Cambridge, MN as a teen.  It was about a two and a half hour drive from Duluth.  I left on Friday at around noon and arrived by the late afternoon.  I stopped for lunch along the way and also picked up some DNR approved firewood outside of the park.  I had reserved a campsite that was several sites away from other reservations, as I wanted to be alone.  Upon arrival, I checked in, set-up my tent, and read a little from the Frida Kahlo biography.  The campsite was fairly busy, with many of the sites reserved.  I was a little surprised to see so many massive RVs, complete with trucks, bicycles, grills, and scampering hordes children.  From six to nine pm, each of the campsites seemed to be a Thanksgiving feast of grilled foods.  The campground itself was a little too chaotic to be relaxing.  I walked around a little to orient myself, then hiked for the next three to four hours along the various trails near the campsite.   Thankfully, the trails were quiet.  I only saw a handful of hikers once I was away from the campground.  I was immediately struck by the bountiful birdlife.  The forest was alive with the sounds of numerous birds, which flitted by with frustrating speed.  I noticed several bluebirds and a rose-breasted grosbeak during my hike.  I also heard an owl later on, but could not identify it.  Another highlight was a pair of noisy ravens.  Beyond the birds, the forest was teeming with trilliums and other wildflowers.  Since it was warmer than in Duluth, the season was further along, with more flowers and foliage than in the north. DSCF6175 I wore myself out with walking and settled back down at my campsite.  I build a fire, but didn’t actually pack any foods for cooking as I was only going to be gone for less than 24 hours.  Instead, I nibbled on the snacks that I had packed while watching the fire and listening to the sounds of the forest.  It was very calming and empowering, since it provided me mental space from the daily demands of work and activism.  It was empowering in that I felt proud of myself for hiking alone, driving there myself, setting up the tent and fire, and entertaining myself with my own company.  The only downside was that it would have been nice to pack a lamp or candle so that I could have written in my journal after sunset.  I also forgot to pack extra batteries.  I also managed to forget to pack my glasses and a pair of flipflops.  My headlamp went dead and it made using the restroom difficult.  Despite these shortfalls in my planning, I enjoyed staring at the fire and remained with it until it died.  I then retreated to my tent for sleep.  Even after using the bathroom twice before bedtime, I inevitably awoke in the middle of the night to contemplate answering nature’s call or trying to wait until morning. DSCF6192 DSCF6208 My sleep was uneasy.  I certainly felt worn out, but I tossed and turned.  My mind was full of thoughts and ideas.  I was also excited about my mini adventure.   I am not sure how many hours of sleep I managed to obtain.  By five in the morning, the birds were singing in full force, so I abandoned my efforts at sleeping.  I woke up early, packed up all of my things, and nibbled on granola while studying bird books.  I found a used book on warblers of the Midwest from the Superior Public Library book sale.  At about seven in the morning, I left the campsite for the boat landing on the St. Croix river, where a bird walk was scheduled.  I was the first birder to arrive.  Two seasoned birders began their work listening for songs and scanning the treetops.  They adeptly identified birds by their songs and picked them out even as they zipped through the sky.  I was not very skilled at identification, but at least saw some familiar birds and took notes on what the others saw and heard.  I am not sure how every birder I meet is so skilled.  There must be beginners like me.  It takes years of studying to identify birds.  Where are all of the novices?

(Some of the photos are blurry, but it should depict a Scarlet tanager, black and white warbler, American red start, yellow rumped warbler, and Eastern bluebird) Once more birders arrived, we hiked around for two hours.  The goal was to record all of the species of birds we saw that morning so that the data could be compared to other International Birding Day counts at the park.  There were bluebirds and Baltimore orioles.  We saw tree swallows living in bluebird houses.  A female wood duck flew overhead.  An Eastern kingbird showed off the white markings on its tail feathers.  A few house wrens had taken up residence in some ramshackle abandoned bird houses.  We also saw many warblers, including a blue winged warbler, yellow warbler, golden winged warbler, palm warbler, black and white warbler, and American redstart.  The warblers were quick and kept to the top of the trees.  A flash of yellow would sail by overhead and everyone immediately knew what it was.  Faint chirps were also readily identified.  I stood there, stupefied by the variety of quick moving, similar looking, yellow birds.  Since this hike, I have gone out birding around Duluth and Superior and managed to identify some more warblers.  Maybe someday I will know them as well as the other birders.  In all, I wrote down over twenty birds that were new to my life list.  The group counted over fifty birds for the total species count.


Following the count, I decided to go on a final hike.  I drove to the visitor’s center, where a scarlet tanager was hanging out in a treetop.  An ovenbird sang in the distance.  The visitor’s center was soon visited by a young black bear.  I wandered along a trail for a short final hike.  Along the hike, I saw several more scarlet tanagers and Baltimore orioles.  I also saw a yellow bellied sapsucker and a group of cowbirds.  With the final hike out of the way, I set off for the two hour drive home.  But, the birding adventures had helped me with my bird identification skills.  For the past several evenings since then, I have tried to memorize bird songs.  Auditory bird identification is not a skill that I have spent any time developing and I can see how useful it is.

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Learning to identify birds is challenging.  There is a lot of information that one has to gather in a short amount of time.  Birds are very quick, so size, color, beak shape, flight pattern, song, behaviors, etc. are some of the data that one must collect within a few seconds.  The reward is a better understanding of the inhabitants of the natural world and a keener eye for the hidden details around us (at least in regard to birds).  Another bonus is the ability to add a bird to a life list.  I like lists.  They make me feel accomplished, since it allows me to quantify and organize some aspect of my reality.     Even camping adds to my lists, as it added to my list of state parks I have visited.  More than an odd obsession with quantifying my life, camping offered quietude and self-efficacy.    It also offered a relatively low cost sample of adventure.

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Orniscaching?: Birding and Geocaching

 

Orniscaching?: Birding and Geocaching

H. Bradford

4/17/17

This weekend I went on a Feminist Frolic and tried geocaching for the first time.  I downloaded an app to my phone and found one awesome, mushroom shaped cache with our group.  The event was a Cache in Trash out event, so we also collected some garbage from the park as part of the adventure.  It was a fun time.  Although it seems that there is a lot of jargon and rules regarding geocaching, I am eager to continue with this new found hobby.  I think that the best thing about this activity is that it involves spending time outdoors while investigating nature for a hidden world of secret treasures.  I was surprised to see how many caches appeared on the map of Superior.  To think that all this time there have been hidden items all around me!  I also like the collective and individual nature of the activity.   Geocaching creates a sense of community, since many people have visited the same site in pursuit of the same time.  The community is evident by the logbook and online logs about the site.  The activity also builds community since it can be done in groups and appeals to all ages.  As for the individual aspect, it can also be done solo, as I did today.  So, it can feel like an individual quest to follow in the path of many others to a common destination.


After trying the activity for the first time on Saturday, I decided that I would head out on a birding + geocaching adventure.   Adam decided that he was interested in coming along, so we headed to Cloverland, WI to the Roy Johnson Wetlands.  I also wanted to visit the Davidson Windmill to try to find a cache.  So, we set out on an adventure to the rural areas outside of Superior.


Early on, I became quite frustrated.  I soon learned that it is very hard to operate a car, a camera, and the geocaching app on my phone.  I also learned that there is very spotty cellphone reception in that area.   I hadn’t downloaded the maps for geocaching which made this aspect of the adventure impossible.  I was angry at myself, since I wanted to try out my new activity.  I also became angry because I saw various hawks on wires and flying over the farmland.  However, they either flew away before I could identify them or I was unable to stop.  Adam wasn’t keen on the slow driving and stop and go, as he wanted to head to Cloverland.  I was unhappy with trying to juggle driving, birding, and caching.   In any event, I passed up several birds on the way to the Windmill.  Thankfully, my phone sort of worked at the Windmill, but after milling about for 20 minutes, I failed to find the cache.  This was a very bad start to our journey and heralded the end of my attempt to geocache.  Instead, I would focus on birds.


We traveled to Cloverland and went on a short hike, but didn’t spot any birds.  We continued down a dirt road past an old barn, where Adam said he’d seen an owl in the past.  Adam spotted a dark, moving object in a tree near the barn.  This was hopeful!  However, it turned out to be a porcupine.  The porcupine lifted my spirits a bit, and we continued onward.  Our drive did not yield any unusual birds, but we pushed on towards the Roy Johnson Wetlands.


Not far from the wetlands was a trail or narrow road, which ascended a muddy hill.  We hiked up the hill and our luck with birding changed.   The top of the hill featured a small pond with a nesting goose.  The road was flanked by scraggy bushes, where small birds flitted back and forth.  They were too quick for me, but I managed to photograph a robin and a dark eyed junco.  By then, the sun was setting, so our time was limited.  A large hawk flew by, keeping low to the ground as it hugged the curves of the marshy landscape.  I captured a blurry photo of what appeared to be a light gray hawk with a white underside.  I believe that it was a Northern Harrier hawk.  Finally, as we continued a little further down the trail I spotted what looked like a chickadee with a yellow bottom!  Of course, this little bird did not turn around, so I had a hard time determining what it was.  My best guess is that it was a yellow-rumped warbler.   Spotting these two birds redeemed the adventure, though by then I was already over my earlier frustration over my lack of organization and inability to juggle my activities.  I decided that I would try geocaching + birding the next day!

Today, I woke up and realized it was cold and windy out.  This put a damper on my outdoor adventures until the late afternoon.  Once the sun peeked out and the wind seemed less intimidating, I hurried to Park Point…determined to make geocaching and birding work.  I set out alone and on foot, which is the key to balancing these two hobbies.   It also helped that I had cellphone reception.  With my bird books, camera, and phone, I started hiking!  The hike was pleasant and birds were plentiful.  Several birds of prey flew overhead.  However, they were too fast for me to identify.  One was quite large with dark banding under the wings.  I am new at identifying birds, so this usually involves photographing birds and then comparing them to the bird guides.  I admired the birds as they passed by, then continued into the woods.  I spotted a red-breasted nuthatch and then a quick moving bird that bounced from branch to branch and tree to tree.   I spent quite a while observing it, trying to photograph it and commit its features to memory.  The bird had a bright yellow crown and solid white or gray stomach.  Its eyes were masked with a black stripe.  I assumed that it might be some kind of warbler.  There are numerous warblers and I don’t really know how to identify any of them.  However, using the bird guide, it seems that the bird most closely resembled a golden-crowned kinglet.

Near where I spotted the golden-crowned kinglet was a cache.  I looked around, but did not find it.  However, there were several more up the trail, so I continued.  Along the way, I found two caches.  This was great!  But, I failed to find a third cache further up the trail.  As I had a meeting at 5:30 pm, I hurried along, trying to find one more cache before I had to turn around.  I managed to find one more, but failed to find one more for lack of time.  With that, I turned around and hurried back to my car.  The hike back yielded two more birds of prey.  One of them had distinct black wing tips on its underside and a head that was darker gray than the rest of its body.  Its underside appeared to be lightly barred.  I was confused, but I think it may have been another Northern harrier hawk.   Finally, I saw one last bird of prey at the top of a conifer.  It was smaller than the others and of course, hard to see.  I moved around to try to view it from different angles.  It may have been a female merlin, but I can’t know for sure.  I also spotted a common merganser.

Prior to Saturday, I did a little birding at WI Point and Loon’s Foot landing.  Many of the ducks I had seen in the previous weeks have seemingly moved along.  I did capture a picture of a female cardinal though.


In all, it seems that geocaching and birding compliment each other.  In both activities, I am searching for something.  Both have highs and lows.  It is certainly disappointing to miss a cache.  It is also frustrating when I struggle to identify birds as they are too quick or I am just not skilled enough.  However, these struggles make identifying a new bird or finding a cache all the more exciting!    I know that some people do both activities at the same time, but oddly, there is no name for it (that I saw online anyway!).  Since geocaching seems to have developed its own language, I think I will call it orniscaching!

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Bird Nerding Notes: Early April

Bird Nerding Notes: Early April

H. Bradford

4/10/17

I’ve been out quite a bit in the past few weeks in pursuit of birds.  One adventure was with my mother, but I’ve been trying to go out daily for at least some birding.  I’ve checked out Wisconsin Point, the Western Waterfront Trail, and Loons Foot Landing for birds and all three of them have yielded some new birds for my list.  It has been an exciting adventure, as it has helped me to realize all of the birds that are around me that I never really noticed before.  Like I’ve noted before, it is like an endless scavenger hunt.


Wisconsin Point:

My first adventure on Wisconsin Point yielded one new species.  I found some common mergansers close to shore.  Of course, they were quick to swim away, but it was neat to see a new bird.  I visited for several days in a row, noting many common mergansers, even if they were far away from the shore.  Because the birds are pretty shy, it is no wonder that I have never noticed them in all of the years that I have visited Wisconsin point.  Otherwise, a large flock of seagulls had assembled on a sheet of ice, which slowly melted over the course of a week.  I am not experienced enough to identify different species of seagulls, which all look pretty similar to me.  Among the seagulls were some immature bald eagles.

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Western Waterfront Trail:

The Western Waterfront Trail yielded several other species of birds.  Again, the birds were spotted from a distance and only identified by zooming in on the photos I had taken.  I noted a Common golden eye and Hooded merganser while hiking along the trail.  Again, the birds were shy and even though I was quite a distance away from them, they were quick to move along.  I hike on the Western Waterfront Trail dozens of times during the year but have never noticed these birds before.  I hiked the trail later in the week and again spotted a flotilla of these same birds.

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Loon’s Foot Landing:

My best birding has been at Loon’s Foot Landing in Superior.  I have spotted Hooded mergansers, common mergansers, Northern shoveler, pied grebe,  Common goldeneye, bufflehead ducks, Ring necked ducks, green winged teal, and what appeared to be Greater scaup.   These waterfowl seem to enjoy hanging out together in a quiet corner behind some cattails.  It makes photographing them a bit of challenge since they are safely tucked away quite a distance from the trail.  I also saw my first Great blue heron of the season fly overhead.

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Ring-necked duck

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Pied-billed grebes

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Green winged teal, Northern shoveler, and Ring necked duck

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Hooded merganser

Beyond the waterfowl were some interesting passerine birds.   While walking back to my car, I spotted what appeared to be a robin sized bird in the brush near the shore.  I followed the bird, trying to get a closer look.  It was quick and active, but finally slowed down long enough to take a photo.  It turned out to be a fox sparrow, which was pretty neat.  I am slowly learning different kinds of sparrows, which until this year all seemed like ordinary brown birds that didn’t warrant much attention.   The Fox sparrow was unique because of its gray and rust colored plumage and its large size compared to other sparrows.   When I was following it, I thought maybe it was a female red winged blackbird.  Only with the help of the camera was I able to identify it.   Since then, I have visited Loon’s Foot Landing almost daily.   While I have mostly noted the same birds each day, today I happened to see an interesting bird on top of a tree.  I assumed it might be a robin, but upon closer inspection it was gray in color with a sharp beak and black band by its eyes.  The mysterious bird appeared to be a Northern shrike!  These birds are interesting, since they are carnivorous song birds that impale their prey on barbed wire and thorns.  The bird is not very large, but manages to use its sharp beak to kill smaller birds, rodents, insects, etc.  The bird is nicknamed the butcher bird because it is known to store meat in holes or on wires.  I have also seen a Northern flicker, Northern cardinals, chickadees, and red winged blackbirds at this spot.

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Conclusion:

It has been fun going out and observing birds.  I suppose that my friends have been a little bored, as I’ve dragged them along on some of my adventures.  One of the most fun aspects of birding is the realization that there are all these interesting birds around us all of the time, but for years, they went unnoticed and unnamed.  Learning to identify new birds is a bit like learning a new language.  It opens up a whole new reality.  It is the same with learning anything new.  Learning to identify ferns, butterflies, amphibians, trees, etc. opens one up to the unique characteristics of the universe around us.  The life around us is usually the backdrop of our own lives.  It is just the setting, full of unnoticed extras.  To know the names of birds, their habits, their songs, and that they were there all along…is a small peak into the vastness of our universe and the richness of the life of this planet.

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Bird Nerding Notes: Birding with My Mother

Bird Nerding Notes: Birding with My Mother

H. Bradford

4/10/17


My mother and I don’t spend that much time together.  I keep a pretty busy schedule which doesn’t always align well with the schedules of others.  But, last weekend we both went birding together.  I wanted to visit Savannah Portage State Park and Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge for some birding adventures.  I invited her along and since she wasn’t busy, we set off together for a Saturday of bird watching.


 

The day began with a drive to Wright, MN.   It is only an hour from where I now live, but I only visit a few times a year.  We went to what once was the Wright Place Cafe, which I hadn’t eaten at in over a decade.  I was a waitress there for a summer, back when I was 19 years old.  In a way, it is surreal returning to where I grew up since it is very foreign to me, yet near.  I feel like a ghost.  That I was never really there at all, since the person I am now is so distant from that past self.   There are so many years between us.   Following breakfast, we set out on our birding adventure.


Our first sighting was just outside of Tamarack, MN.  We noticed a grayish, hawk-like bird on a power line, overlooking two pastures.  I turned the car around to get a closer look.  Unfortunately, this scared the bird away.  After a careful pursuit, I managed to get a photograph of the unknown bird.  The zoom capacity of my camera is not that great, but it is enough to aid in the identification of birds (even if the photos themselves are not that wonderful).   We flipped back and forth between the camera image and our bird book.  Finally, we determined it was an American Kestrel.  I wrote it down in my little notebook.

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Our journey continued towards Savannah Portage State Park.  The road wound around various lakes, where we caught sight of swans.  However, the shoulder was too narrow and the ditch to deep to stop and look at the swans.  My mother promised that I would see swans later, but it was frustrating to have to pass up so many of them along the way!  Finally, we arrived at the state park.  I bought a sticker for the year and a patch (I am collecting state park patches).  What should I do with my collection of patches?  My mother suggested that I could sew them onto a jacket, which I wear for my state park adventures.  This seems extremely nerdy, but also like something I might actually do.  I like having special apparel for various occasions.


Savannah Portage State Park did not have many birds.  The small lakes in the park were still frozen and it was the middle of the day by the time we arrived.  We went on a short hike by a lake and over a bog walk.  This was neat, since we found frozen pitcher plants and overturned trees (from the storm last summer).   I would like to visit again during the summer.

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We drove around Big Sandy Lake, spotting more swans.  In 1850, Sandy Lake was the site of a massacre of Native Americans.  Although I never learned this in school (and grew up just 30-40 min away), over 200 Ojibwe died there from illness, starvation, and cold.  They were told to go there to receive their yearly annuity payment and supplies from the BIA, which arrived late and in short supply.   There is a small plaque memorializing the events at a rest area along Highway 65.   This is a reminder that the area really doesn’t belong to settlers, even though it serves as a recreational area today.


After stopping at the Dairy Queen in McGregor, we continued on to Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge.  This is where we spotted many birds.  Our first encounter was on a small bridge, where we saw various ducks.  Of course, the ducks were shy and quickly scattered.  I used my camera to try to hone in on some of the distant waterfowl.  There were some unique sightings.  The first sighting was a duck with a light gray colored back, dark head, and black chest.  This was hard to identify and we wrongly identified it as a canvasback.  However, after re-examining the photos, it was actually a Greater scaup (or it could be a lesser scaup?).  The duck had a blue bill and yellow eye.  It was my first time identifying a Greater scaup.  Another duck, was a small, black and white duck which frequently dove underwater.  We identified it as a bufflehead.  This is the first time that I have identified one since I began birding.

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We explored the many lakes and roads of the wildlife refuge.  Interestingly, when we were stopped on the bridge, a friendly Native American man on a makeshift motorbike stopped by to invite us to watch him make maple syrup.  We didn’t take him up on the offer, but he said that there was a group of people making syrup in the park.  Even though the refuge is mostly used for recreation and bird watching, it was also a reminder that it also has cultural significance.   The park is still used by Native Americans for harvesting wild rice, which as the name suggests, grows in the lakes of the area.  The park also features burial mounds which may date back to as far as 1000 BC.


On Rice Lake itself, we spotted bald eagles, trumpeter swans, various ducks, a muskrat, and an Eastern bluebird perched nearby.  We heard whooping cranes from somewhere in the area.  The ducks were too far away to identify, but the area was teeming with life and I finally was able to see the swans!


We returned to my mother’s house about 20 minutes away.  Near her home, we spotted a killdeer and a turkey.  The turkey was quick to escape my camera, so I only obtained a photo of its rump.  We also saw two more trumpeter swans on School House Lake near her house.

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Overall, it was a fun day.  Birding can actually be tiring, since there are highs and lows.  It is definitely a high to see a bird that I haven’t recorded before.  The fact that birds move quickly or might be too far away to identify is a low.   It also requires some degree of focus and vigilance, since birds can appear anywhere and may be hard to spot.  By the end of the day, I was tired!

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Bird Nerd Notes: Early Spring Birding

Bird Nerd Notes: Early Spring Birding

H. Bradford

4/1/17

When I was a kid, I never had much interest in birds.  My grandma Bradford kept a feeder, which was visiting by pine grosbeaks and evening grosbeaks.  My grandpa Bradford would feed the ducks near his house old bread or cracked corn.   My grandma Walli loved bluebirds.   Growing up in the country and on a lake, birds were a part of rural life.  Birds were interesting, but never caught my attention.   Oddly enough, it was plants that captured my attention.  I remember in the first and second grade, I would draw pictures of the plants that I found growing in the woods near my home.  I folded these pages in half, making botanical guides.  I wanted to be a botanist.   Birds didn’t interest me much at all.


I enjoy trying new hobbies, so my new year’s resolution in 2016 was to try birding as a new hobby.  I simply wanted to try something new and expand my knowledge into a new frontier.    My first birding adventure was pretty lackluster.  I went to Jay Cooke State Park for a New Year’s birding hike, but we only saw chickadees.  However, later that month a wayward Ivory billed gull appeared in Duluth.  I set out early one morning before my work meeting to try to find it.  Spotting it and then being joined by other birders….all older people with fancy cameras and binoculars, was a neat experience.  We were all there for the same thing…though me with a lot less gear.   (I do have a camera and binoculars now, but certainly not expensive and i really, really wish I had more ability to zoom… )   I think what really cemented this hobby was my trip to Africa, where I saw over 150 species of birds.   But, birding doesn’t have to involve travel or expensive gear.  It can happen in the backyard or in nearby parks.

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I am still learning to identify birds and I am not terribly studious in my approach.   I treat this hobby more like an endless scavenger hunt.  It is exciting to add new birds to my list.  In the process of searching for birds, I learn more about them, how to identify them, when and where to find them, etc.  So, it is experiential learning.  It mostly involves seeing the swift departure of some unknown bird and the disappointment that I did not identify it in time.  That happened to me several times today.  But, when I do find a new bird, it is great!  Sometimes, I see a bird, but I don’t have my binoculars or camera.  Again, it is a missed opportunity!   Another frustrating aspect of this hobby is that most people my age…are pretty indifferent to birds.  So, I feel like a bird nerd…who prattles on about some bird that no one cares about.  I have to monitor myself to make sure I don’t bore others or put them off with this hobby that they have no interest in.

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No birds.  The story of my March birding endeavors.


One thing that I have learned this month is that early March is sort of the doldrums of birding.  Until this year, I never really paid attention to what birds are around and when.  Sure, I always noticed the spring and fall migrations, but I never really paid that close attention to the patterns of bird life around me.   In early March, I went to the Sax Zim Bog.  This was the last weekend that the bird center there was open for the winter season.  I had visited the center in mid-February.   The contrast was stark.  There were far fewer birds active during my my early March visit.   I saw a single gray jay, in contrast to the many gray jays I saw in February.  There were no more flocks of white winged cross bills.   However, I did see some pine grosbeaks at a feeder on the way out of the birding area.  Even though the birds were scarce, I enjoyed taking a snowy hike with my mother.   It is too bad that the Sax Zim Bog is so remote.  It takes about an hour to drive there and the roads are winding, dirt country roads.  Still, it is a great place to go birding.

In mid-march, I went to St. Croix State Park.  The goal was to try to do some birding, while reaching my OTHER new year’s resolution of visiting a few more new state parks.  I have never visited St. Croix State Park before, but it is only about an hour away near Hinckley, Minnesota.   The park was almost entirely devoid of birds, with the exception of crows.   I enjoyed a hike and had fun searching for agates in the parking lot with Dan, but as far as birding goes, it was a pretty uneventful day.    However, we did spot some immature bald eagles on the way to the park.  After leaving the park, we spotted two fields of what I assume were tundra swans.  I assumed they were tundra swans because they migrate through Minnesota in March as they head to the arctic to nest.   There were also other tundra swans spotted in area fields that week (which is why I made the guess that it could be tundra swans).  To really identity the difference, I would have had to see the beak, which is often yellow at the base versus all black (for a trumpeter swan).    They also have different beak shapes.  Tundra swans are also more numerous, and since there were two fields of swans, it seemed logical that they would be tundra swans over the less common trumpeter swans.

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These swans were too far away to perfectly identify.

Throughout the month, I went on various hikes, but did not see much bird life other than black capped chickadees, white breasted nuthatches, and crows.  However, with the warm weather this week, there has suddenly been an explosion of waterfowl.  Today, I went to Wisconsin Point intent on a short hike, but ended up trudging through swampy cattails to try to identify some unknown waterbirds.  I am sure there were new species of birds for me to see, but I could only positively identify a few groups of Common mergansers.  Still, this is a new bird for my list!  Otherwise, I saw many familiar birds such as Canadian geese and red winged blackbirds.  I also saw a gull with a black face, but it flew by too quickly to positively identity.  In any event, the sudden appearance of so many waterfowl heralds the end of my birding doldrums this month.   In all, my experience this month make me feel more attuned to the seasonal movements of birds in my region.  My goal was to see 50 new species of birds this year.  That may be a bit ambitious.  But, I can say that I am slowly becoming a bird nerd.

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Vangarden Notes: For the Birds

Vangarden Notes: For the Birds

H. Bradford

3.31.17

I feel that I have not had time to pursue hobbies lately.   It seems that activism and work take up the lion’s share of my life.   To some degree, I’ve wanted to make time for more hobbies this month.  To this end, I decided that I was finally going to paint some bird houses.  With the spring migration underway, it seemed like the perfect time to spruce up some of the bird houses that Adam’s brother donated to us.  The bird houses are designed with bluebirds in mind, but according to the National Blue Bird Society the boxes may be used by chickadees, some species of wrens, nuthatches,  tree swallows, and house sparrows.  Last year, one of our boxes was used by a chickadee, which seems like the most likely candidate for nesting in our small, urban yard, which we call “The Vangarden.”


I spent a few evenings painting the boxes.  I am not great at using paint, but it was a fun little hobby project.  What’s more, it looks great to have our yard and house decorated with a half dozen bird houses.   Even if the birds don’t utilize them, I think it adds to the yard décor and communicates our hopes for a wildlife and community friendly yard.  We put the bird houses up in mid March, which I read is the recommended time of year for hanging bird houses in northern states.


Here are a few of the designs:

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This is one of my favorite of the houses that I painted.  I had fun painting some cheerful sunflowers in a vaguely impressionistic style.  Although it looks pretty, I read that birds prefer more naturally colored bird houses.   Interestingly, birds see both the color spectrum that we see and the UV spectrum (well, birds of prey and nocturnal birds less so).  Birds that do not appear to have gender differences in plumage actually appear differently to birds, which can see plumage markings and colors that are invisible to us!  Thus, blue jays, crows, chickadees, and other similar looking birds actually look different (invisible sexual dimorphism) to the birds themselves.

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Another bird house that I painted featured a moon stars, and the Northern Lights.  I actually tried to add some constellations to the box, but it is hard to tell since I added a lot of random dots as well.  I read that bird houses should not be painted dark colors because they can overheat.  But, our yard is very shady….especially the side of the house where this bird house was placed.  I am not too concerned that it will get too hot.

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The above bird house was painted to look like a barn.  The white paint was a little bit drippy so it is not as tidy as I would have liked.

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This birdhouse was made to look like a green colored house with birch trees and a conifer tree on the opposite side.

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Finally, this bird house was made to look like a dark blue house.


Hopefully some birds use these houses this year!   The boxes have been hung on a few sides of the house.  Realistically, they are not spaced far enough apart or covered enough to be ideal nesting sites.  For instance, Black capped chickadees prefer to nest at least 650 feet away from each other.  Nuthatches prefer one box per 6 acres!  Two of the boxes where placed on the front side of the house, where there is a spruce tree and shaggy boxwood bush…but also a busy street.  Our yard is pretty small, so there are not ample choices of where to hang the boxes.  However, perhaps if we obtain others we can consider this an experiment.  Which boxes will get used?  What area of our yard is favored by birds?  Will we attract any other species of nesting birds (other than the chickadee last year)?  Whatever the outcome of our project, it is fun to paint the houses as a hobby and a nice way to decorate our yard.

A Year of Birding

A Year of Birding

H. Bradford

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One of my many New Year’s resolutions last year was to try a few new hobbies.  One of the hobbies that I tested out this year was birding.  Birding, or the act of observing or listening for birds, is pretty interesting.  The average age of a birder is 53 years old.  According to a report from the US Fish and Wildlife Service (2013), 30% of birders are over the age of 55.  23% are between ages 45 and 54.  Thus, this is a hobby where I am actually on the young side!  About 50% of birders make over $50,000 a year, so it seems to be a hobby for people with more money than the average American, myself included.  About 56% of birders are women, though perhaps this is because there are more older women than men.  88% of birders are backyard observers of birds, whereas 38% are birders who travel at least a mile to view birds (there is overlap between these groups).  As a whole, the average birder is probably an older, white female, with above average income and education, who lives in the urban south.  This is a hobby that is not known for its appeal to people of color, youth, working class people, the LGBTQ community, etc.  Despite the lack of diversity, there are several reasons why I was attracted to birding.  1.) It is an easy going, outdoor hobby.  2.) I like to make lists.  3.) It is an example of citizen science, since birders can play a role in collecting scientific data about birds. 4.) Birds are basically feathered dinosaurs…so, birding is modern day dinosaur tracking.  Finally, despite the fact that it is a hobby for those with more income, I was able to do birding just my eyes and a guidebook.  I did most of my birding on trips that I was already taking (so I did not take the trips with the purpose of birding, but chose to look out for birds while travelling), with some birding done locally.  Next year, I would like to take advantage of more local birding opportunities.


My year of birding began with a birding hike at Jay Cooke State Park.  The hike did not yield many birds, though we did see many chickadees, crows, nuthatches, and woodpeckers.  The next boon for birding was when an ivory billed gull appeared in Duluth.  The bird was usually found in the Arctic, but found itself outside of its range.  When I heard that it had been spotted in Canal Park, I awoke early one morning to see if I could catch it.  Sure enough, I spotted it on the Lakewalk near Grandma’s Restaurant.  I visited it several more times over the next few days.  Getting up early to see the wayward gull made me feel like a “real” birder, since I was joined by people with binoculars and fancy cameras.  After seeking out the gull, my birding mostly consisted of trying to record the birds that I saw in my backyard.  I think that this is one of the most appealing things about birding.  For most of my life, I have been pretty indifferent to birds.  But, once I started paying attention, I noticed that the world was abundant with bird life.  There is a secret world of birds all around us.

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Bird watching enhanced my trip to Africa.  I kept my eyes peeled for birds, which I recorded in a journal throughout the trip.  I would sketch them out or photograph them so that I could compare them to the birds in my guide.  There were so many wonderful birds!  I remember seeing my first flocks of flamingos as well as the large flocks at Walvis Bay, Namibia.  It is strange to see wild birds that you would normally only get to see in zoos.  Other highlights included spotting African spoonbills and Marabou Storks.  Maribou Storks are bald headed storks which scavenge dead flesh.  There were colorful Malachite kingfishers and bright Lilac breasted roller birds.  I saw several species of hornbills, which was very iconically African.   There were herons, ibises, egrets, and a variety of other waterbirds.  In all, I spotted 63 species of birds in Africa.

While Africa was probably the best birding experience I will ever have, I had another fun experience while visiting my brother in Texas.  I went to the South Padre Island Birding and Nature Center.  My family spent about two hours here, but it was not enough time for me, so I stayed for several hours longer while they enjoyed lunch and a waterpark.  During my trek along the boardwalk, I spotted Great Blue herons, Roseate spoonbills,  Brown Pelicans, osprey, Tricolor herons, Snowy egrets, etc.  It was amazing how similar the birdlife was to the birds that I spotted in Africa.  While the species were different, many of the birds in Texas either filled similar ecological niches or were local species of the same birds.  For instance, South Padre Island had Roseate spoonbills rather than African spoonbills.  I spotted Anhinga in Texas and African Darters in Namibia and Botswana.  Both are similar looking darters with long, snake like necks and jagged dark feathers that they dry in the sun.  Although unrelated, the caracara that I saw alongside the road reminded me of a Secretary bird in its coloration and eating habits.  Of course, I saw a variety of egrets in Texas as well.  The cattle egrets that I saw in Africa are the very same species that I saw in Texas.  The bird spread with the spread of humans and domesticated animals.  Though, the cattle egret is a relative newcomer to Texas, having only arrived in the 1960s.  The Great egret spotted at the park is almost identical to the Great egret spotted in Africa, though they are different subspecies.  The Caspian tern is also found in both Africa and Texas.

I am still at the very beginning stages of learning about birds.  However, perhaps by the time I am 53, the average age of a birder, I will be well-versed in the world of birds.  One appeal of birding is that it is basically an endless scavenger hunt.  Some birders compete to see how many birds they can identify in the world or in a country in a single year (this is called a Big Year).  I think that this year may be my own “Big Year” as I doubt I will see as many species in a year as I saw this year!  This year also helped to give me a start on my Life List, or the list of birds that a birder has seen in their lifetime.  In all, I probably saw over 130 species of birds this year.  To me this seems like a lot, but it is small compared to the 10,000 species of birds in the world!

With that said, here is the list of birds that I have seen this year.   I will eventually go back and organize the list using scientific names.  Otherwise, the count may go up, as I plan on participating in the Christmas bird count:

 

Texan Birds:

  1. Willet
  2. White Winged dove
  3. Mockingbird
  4. Forester’s tern
  5. Redhead duck
  6. Crested caracra
  7. Great tailed grackle
  8. Common grackle
  9. House sparrow
  10. Harris’ Hawk
  11. Sanderling
  12. Black-bellied Plover
  13. Brown Pelican
  14. American coot
  15. Great Blue heron
  16. Roseate spoonbill
  17. Little blue heron
  18. Northern pintail
  19. White ibis
  20. Great egret
  21. Laughing gull
  22. Common gallinule
  23. Blue wing teal
  24. Osprey
  25. Least tern
  26. Long billed curlew
  27. Black necked stilt
  28. Snowy egret
  29. Tricolor heron
  30. American wigeon
  31. Mottled duck
  32. Spotted sandpiper
  33. Clapper rail
  34. Turkey vulture
  35. Belted kingfisher
  36. Anhinga
  37. American white pelican
  38. Carolina Wren

African birds

  1. Blue waxbill
  2. Southern ground hornbill
  3. Black collared barbet
  4. Hammerkop
  5. Gray lorie (Goaway bird)
  6. Egyptian goose
  7. Secretary bird
  8. Red billed hornbill
  9. Black Winged lapwing
  10. Crimson breasted shrike
  11. Cardinal woodpecker
  12. Pied kingfisher
  13. Bank cormorant
  14. Spur winged goose
  15. Little bee eater
  16. Fish eagle
  17. African jacana
  18. Malachite kingfisher
  19. Red Collared widowbird
  20. Ostrich
  21. Greater flamingo
  22. Cape gannet
  23. Reed cormorant
  24. African darter
  25. Sacred ibis
  26. Helmeted guineafowl
  27. Cape sparrow
  28. Sociable weaver
  29. Cape white eye
  30. Karoo korhaan
  31. Great white pelican
  32. Great white egret
  33. Yellow billed hornbill
  34. African pied wagtail
  35. Red eyed bulbul
  36. Dark canting goshawk
  37. Cape glossy starling
  38. Pied crow
  39. Kori Bustard
  40. Green wood hoopoe
  41. Dark capped bulbul
  42. African Spoonbill
  43. Lilac Breasted roller
  44. Marabou stork
  45. Red billed oxpecker
  46. Squacco heron
  47. Gray heron
  48. Cattle egret
  49. Purple heron
  50. White faced duck
  51. Gray headed gull
  52. African Skimmer
  53. Yellow billed stork
  54. Caspian tern
  55. Laughing dove
  56. Magpie shrike
  57. African crowned eagle
  58. Trumpeter hornbill
  59. Black kite
  60. Hooded vulture
  61. Fork tailed drongo
  62. Black crake
  63. Red winged starling

Local Birds:

1.Black capped chickadee

2.White breasted Nuthatch

  1. American Crow
  2. Northern Flicker
  3. Blue Jay
  4. Dark eyed junco
  5. Downy Woodpecker
  6. Hairy Woodpecker
  7. Ivory Gull
  8. Common loon
  9. Canadian goose
  10. Snow goose
  11. Mallard Duck
  12. Killdeer
  13. Cedar Waxwing
  14. Pileated woodpecker
  15. Ruffed grouse
  16. Ruby throated hummingbird
  17. Red winged blackbird
  18. Ring billed gull
  19. Barred owl

22.American goldfinch

  1. Double crested cormorant

24.Mourning dove

  1. American robin
  2. Northern Cardinal

27.Scarlet Tanager

  1. Common redpoll

29.Tundra swan

  1. Wild turkey
  2. Common merganser

 

 

My African List

My African List

H. Bradford

This past summer I went on an overland tour of Southern Africa.  This involved traveling on bumpy, dusty roads for hours on end and camping.  It also involved travel with two dozen strangers from around the world.  The social part of travel is always very challenging.  I don’t make friends very easily.  If everyone is an ice cream flavor, perhaps I am avocado, cardamom, or red bean ice cream.  SOME people may like these ice cream flavors, but few crave them.  Time and time again, I have been stuck with groups of strangers.  I have watched from the sidelines as strangers become friends.  I have seen people who hardly knew each other, part in tears.  There are hugs and sorrowful farewells.  All the while, I am empty and alone off to the side.  The My Little Ponies were right: friendship is magic.  I have seen the magic do its mysterious work all around me, but so rarely on me.  That is how I feel when I travel with groups.  I feel that everyone will become friends and that I will leave alone, just as I arrived.  Ireland, Russia, Korea, Eastern Europe, the Baltics…for the most part, this is the most common outcome.  I certainly have friendships that I cherish, but struggle to make friends when I am plopped together with strangers.  Most of my friends are fellow socialists, atheists, feminists and activists.  However, I don’t find too many of these folks when I travel (unless traveling for a specifically political purpose).  So, like many times before, I found myself with a group of strangers.


The strangers around me were certainly interesting.  They were nice people.  I could converse from time to time.  However, I didn’t really connect, as it often happens.  While the others began to have more fun with each other, becoming more comfortable…I could feel myself drift further away.  So, I began reading and just looking out the window of Ottis, the behemoth of an overland vehicle.  Everything outside of the window was fascinating and unfamiliar.  There were scrubby deserts of giant aloes, mountainous orange dunes, cruel spiked plants, and brightly colored birds.  Everything was strange to me.  As strange as a Dr. Seuss book.  All of the trees.  Every bird.  All of the stars in the sky.  I decided that I wanted to know everything.  I craved knowledge.  I hungered to know the names of all the unknown things that surrounded me.  Thankfully, I brought a guidebook of southern African animals, plants, and birds with me.  I began to make a list.


It wasn’t long before the list became an obsession.  By the time we arrived in Etosha National Park, I used our lunch breaks to wander around the campsite trying to painstakingly identify all of the trees and birds I could find.  I walked alone, baked in the midday heat, looking at leaves and bark, trying to compare what I saw to the guidebook.  Of course, this made everything very exciting.  While the others became excited when they saw lions or zebras, I started to become elated each time I could add anything to the list.  Even a new mouse or weasel was exciting.  I actually was more enamored by the ensemble of three species of vultures I saw in a tree, than the lionesses eating a giraffe below them.  Three more birds to add to the list!  Some animals, reptiles, or birds moved too quickly to be identified, which was met with immediate disappointment at the lost opportunity.  In the Okavango delta, I found almost a dozen species of butterflies in one area.  I spent a few hours chasing butterflies, waiting for them to land and spread their wings so I could quickly eye their markings.  As a result of all of this classification work, I quickly became more competent in the natural world around me.  I could identify birds or trees that I had seen earlier in the trip.


Socially, the list didn’t win me any friends.  However, it made me stand out.  It suddenly became a trope in the group.  Each time a new species was seen, it was pointed out to me so I could add it to the list.  Or, from time to time, I pointed out species to others.  I was the weird girl with the list and a “junior naturalist.”  The list opened up some conversations and questions.  Did the list connect me to them?  More likely it set me more apart, as I was in my own little African scavenger hunt.  I am sure the list was an emblem of my supreme nerdiness.  At the same time, the list made each moment more meaningful.  It gave me a goal.  I obsessively searched for more creatures to add to it.  I decided that I wanted to document 200 species.


The list was also a ritual and distraction.  Sometimes things were a little challenging.  We often awoke early each day.  I was usually the first person awake, as I wanted first dibs on the shower or bathroom.  This meant that most days began in the wintery darkness of 5:30 am.  Sometimes it was earlier.  Each day involved setting up and taking down a tent.  Again, this was usually in chilly darkness, as the winter sun rose late and set early.  The day’s weak heat disappeared very quickly in the dry, cloudless sky.  There was also some cleaning and food preparation that needed to be done.  Rolling up sleeping bags.  Packing and unpacking.  Jostling for long hours on extremely bumpy roads, sometimes through choking clouds of dust.  There was no heat or air conditioning.  Everyone had a pretty good attitude.  But, I think that the other group members obsession with wine and daily drinking was a way to cope with some of these hardships.  Because I don’t drink, I had no similar comfort.  My list was my best distraction.


With that said, here is the list, with a few notes on some of the species.

Birds:

  1. Blue waxbill
  2. Southern ground hornbill
  3. Black collared barbet
  4. Hammerkop
  5. Gray lorie (Goaway bird)
  6. Egyptian goose
  7. Secretary bird
  8. Red billed hornbill
  9. Black Winged lapwing
  10. Crimson breasted shrike
  11. Cardinal woodpecker
  12. Pied kingfisherfscn0934
  13. Bank cormorant
  14. Spur winged goose: This goose is not actually a goose, but in its own family.  It is also poisonous to humans because of its diet of blister beetles.
  15. Little bee eater
  16. Fish eagle: An iconic bird of the Okavango Delta.
  17. African jacana
  18. Malachite kingfisher: One of several kingfishers seen in the Okavango Delta.fscn0867
  19. Red Collared widowbird
  20. Ostrich
  21. Greater flamingo: I saw a flock of flamingos by Walvis Bay.
  22. Cape gannet
  23. Reed cormorant
  24. African darter: This bird has a neck that is slender and crooked like a snake.
  25. Sacred ibis
  26. Helmeted guinea fowl fscn1064
  27. Cape sparrow
  28. Sociable weaver
  29. Cape white eye
  30. Karoo korhaan
  31. Great white pelicandscn0360
  32. Great white egret
  33. Yellow billed hornbillfscn0514
  34. African pied wagtail
  35. Red eyed bulbul
  36. Dark canting goshawk
  37. Cape glossy starling
  38. Pied crow
  39. Kori Bustard:  Everyone called this a Kori “Bastard”  I corrected them on the spelling for popularity points.
  40. Green wood hoopoe
  41. Dark capped bulbul
  42. Spoonbillfscn0993
  43. Lilac Breasted roller: Probably the prettiest bird that I saw!
  44. Marabou stork: This was on my must see list.  It is bald headed, scavenger stork.fscn1055
  45. Red billed oxpecker
  46. Squacco heron: One of several herons spotted in the Hwange National Park area.
  47. Gray heron
  48. Cattle egret
  49. Purple heron
  50. White faced duck
  51. Gray headed gull: I was excited by this one, though everyone else had negative opinions of gulls.
  52. African Skimmer
  53. Yellow billed stork
  54. Caspian tern
  55. Laughing dove
  56. Magpie shrike
  57. African crowned eagle
  58. Trumpeter hornbill: A magnificent large hornbill spotted near Victoria fallsdscn1202
  59. Black kite
  60. Hooded vulture
  61. Fork tailed drongo
  62. Black crake
  63. Red winged starling

Mammals:

  1. Hyrax: It’s closest relative in the elephant!dscn0188
  2. Gemsbok: Survives on water from their food, thus surviving extreme dry conditions.fscn0491
  3. Springbok
  4. Kudufscn1348
  5. Cape fur seal: I saw hundreds of seals in a colony!
  6. Hippopotamus: These were first viewed from a canoe!fscn1283
  7. Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra
  8. Southern Right Whale
  9. Bottlenose dolphin
  10. Impala
  11. Elephantfscn0584
  12. Giraffe
  13. Plains Zebra
  14. Cape ground squirrelfscn0513
  15. Meercat
  16. Chacma baboon
  17. Red hartebeest
  18. Blue wildebeestfscn1322
  19. Black backed jackal
  20. Steenbok
  21. Black rhinofscn0600
  22. Honey badger:  There was a honey badger or ratel at the watering hole with a rhino.  Proof that the honey badger don’t care.
  23. Leopardfscn0712
  24. Slender mongoosefscn0774
  25. White tailed mongoose
  26. Banded mongoosedscf4007
  27. Aardwolf
  28. Spotted hyena
  29. Warthog
  30. Striped mouse: not the most exciting find.
  31. Vervet monkey
  32. Cape buffalo: The last of the big five that I saw. fscn1114
  33. Waterbuck
  34. Sable antelope: the largest of the antelopes fscn1019
  35. Lechwe
  36. Tree squirrel
  37. Elephant shrew
  38. White rhinoceros
  39. Cape hare
  40. Vesper bat

Invertebrates:

1.White lady spider: A large, terrifying white spider that lives in a tunnel.fscn0308

2.Broad banded yellow butterfly

  1. African monarch

4.Green veined chiraxes butterfly

  1. Painted lady butterfly

6.Orange tip butterfly

  1. Purple tip butterfly
  2. Red tip butterfly
  3. Scarlet tip butterfly (so, I basically saw several species of “tipped” butterflies in one area)
  4. Autumn leaf vagrant butterfly

11.Meadow white butterfly

  1. Gaudy commodore butterfly
  2. Guineafowl butterfly (a great name for a great butterfly spotted near Victoria Falls)
  3. Lion ant (one of the small five!)
  4. Common garden snail

Reptiles/Amphibians:

1.Painted reed frog

2.Tinker reed frog

3.Nile crocodile: It was pretty exhilarating seeing my first crocodile sluggishly flop into the cold, early morning water of the Okavango delta.fscn1343

4.Web footed gecko

5.Bushveldt lizard

  1. Bouton’s skink
  2. Common flat lizard
  3. Water monitordscn1106

Fish:

  1. Catfish (not sure what kind)

Plants:

  1. Wild sage
  2. Large fever berry
  3. Marula
  4. Night lily
  5. Day water lily
  6. Quivertree
  7. Camelthorn
  8. King protea
  9. Peach protea
  10. Tree aloe
  11. “Ostrich Lettuce”
  12. Mopane tree
  13. Bread leaf camphor
  14. Pencil Bush Euphorbia
  15. Paper tree
  16. Red thorn acacia
  17. Namaqua fig
  18. Broom karee
  19. Shepherd’s tree
  20. Strangler fig
  21. Crane flower
  22. Red grass aloe
  23. Red ivory
  24. Natal bottlebrush tree
  25. Papyrus
  26. Sausage tree:  (This was one of my must see trees!)
  27. Poison apple
  28. Lowveld clusterleaf
  29. Jackalberry tree
  30. Cape reed
  31. Rush- juncus krausii
  32. Sedge- cyperus dives
  33. Sedge- cyperus obtusi florus  (I was trying REEEEAL hard to get to 200)
  34. Wild hibiscus
  35. Tree fuchsia
  36. Boabab (Another iconic African tree)
  37. Leadwood
  38. Wild basil
  39. Khaki plant
  40. Khat
  41. Tree Euphorbia
  42. Candelabra tree
  43. Red milkwood tree
  44. Natal wild banana
  45. Tree wistaria
  46. Broad leaf ficus
  47. Zimbabwe teak
  48. Lavender tree
  49. Coral tree
  50. Ana tree
  51. Umbrella thorn
  52. Boer bean
  53. Transvaal Sesame
  54. Buffalo thorn
  55. Bead bean
  56. Nyala tree
  57. Small green thorn
  58. Giant raisin
  59. Greenstem corkwood
  60. Knob thorn
  61. Paperback thorn
  62. Morning glory (of some kind)
  63. River bushwillow
  64. Wild date palm

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